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NEW RELEASE – Dec 10, 2018

The UMBC Police Department has joined SafeTrade – a national safety initiative for completing online transactions safely when meeting in person.

SafeTrade is a simple program for police and sheriff’s departments to encourage transactions at their facilities; for classified sites to strengthen their safety and security initiatives, and for users to insist on “SafeTrade” by conducting their transactions only at a local police or sheriff’s office.

The UMBC Police Department is proud to partner with SafeTrade in an effort to provide a safe and secure environment for the University community to conduct transactions.

The UMBC Police Department is open 24 hours / 7 days a week. You may conduct your transaction in the lobby of the station which is under camera surveillance. You only need to advise the dispatcher when you walk in, that you are conducting a SafeTrade transaction.

The UMBC Police Station is located at the rear of Parking Lot #8 across from the Performing Arts and Humanities Building. Any questions please call 410-455-5555.


2018 Scam Alert

Read the FTC’s most recent alerts or browse scams by topic.

A re-occurring crime on UMBC’s campus is the “Online Job Scams”. Job seekers who use online job search websites must be careful to avoid a type of job scam in which the applicant is asked to accept payment to his or her own bank account. These scams are known as “payment-forwarding” or “payment-transfer” scams. These scams involve a con artist who pretends to be an employer and uses a job advertisement to lure an unsuspecting job seeker. Con artists are quite convincing, and may even use company names and corporate logos to convince victims that they are legitimate employers.

There is NO chance of recovering funds or arresting these criminals.
Red flags:
1. Do not forward, transfer, or “wire” money to an employer.
2. Do not transfer money and retain a portion for payment.
3. A contact email address that is not a primary domain. For example, employers calling itself “Omega Inc.” with a “Yahoo!” email address.
4. Misspellings and grammatical mistakes in the job ad.
5. Monster .com lists descriptive words in job postings that are tip-offs to fraud. Their list includes “package-forwarding,” “money transfers,” “wiring funds,” “eBay,” and “PayPal.”
6. World Privacy Forum researchers also found that the terms “Foreign Agent Agreement” often appears in contracts and emails sent to job seekers.
7. Interviewers who tell you-you’re a finalist even though you haven’t had much of an interview.
8. Companies that you can’t find references to in search engines or on sites like the Better Business Bureau. Conversely, companies that are established, but the contact names, numbers, and email addresses don’t match up with what you’ve received. This could indicate someone’s just borrowing a legitimate company’s name.
Contact Detective Chester Smith at smithcht@umbc.edu or UMBC Police at police@umbc.edu for assistance.

Other Email & On-line SCAMS Occurring on UMBC Campus: